Into vs In To | Examples, Definition & Differences

Commonly Confused Words updated on  December 29, 2023 3 min read
Into and in to are pronounced the same, but they have different grammatical uses.

  • Into (without space) is a preposition that describes insertion, collision, transformation, or entry. It is also used to express that someone is involved with or interested in something.
  • In to (with space) is a combination of the two prepositions “in” and “to.” These words are kept separate when they are not connected, such as when “in” is part of a phrasal verb (e.g., “the teacher stepped in to break up the fight”).

Examples: Into in a sentence

Examples: In to in a sentence

Sorry, I’m not into men!

The criminal was turned in to the police by his own mom!

Luke quickly ran into the bathroom before the meeting.

I was just checking in to see how you’re doing.

The artist put a lot of thought into each brushstroke of the masterpiece.

Do you all want to chip in to buy a gift for Samuel?

How to use into

The preposition into is used to describe:

  • Something moving inside of something else
  • Something colliding with something else
  • Someone who is interested in something
  • A mathematical division
  • A transformation

Examples: Into in a sentence
The cat jumped into the box.
I bumped into another car in the parking lot.
Over the holidays, I’ve really gotten into ice-skating.
How many times does 5 go into 25?
Do you think we can turn our garage into a spare bedroom?

How to use in to

In and to are two prepositions that can appear together when “in” is part of a phrasal verb and “to” is part of an infinitive verb phrase. In this context, using into is wrong.

Examples: Into vs in to in a sentence
Leila broke into save her dog.
Leila broke in to save her dog.

I tried logging into the new laptop.
I tried logging in to the new laptop.

In some cases, the choice can affect the meaning of your sentence, such as when two similar phrasal verbs exist, one of which uses “in,” while the other one uses “into.”

Example: Into vs in to in a sentence
Sandra is turning into a popular student [is becoming popular].
Dex is turning Jake in to the police [reporting someone].

Into vs in to quiz

Test your understanding of the difference between “into” and “in to” by filling in either “into” or “in to” in each practice sentence.
Do you want to know more about commas, parts of speech, email, or other language topics? Check out some of our other language articles full of examples and quizzes.


US vs UK

Parts of speech

Rhetoric

Gray vs grey

Action verbs

Metaphor

Judgment or judgement

Stative verbs

Simile

Favour or favor

Transitive verbs

Alliteration

Fulfil or fulfill

Verbs

Assonance

Labor or labour

Nouns

Malapropism


Frequently asked question about into vs in to

Is it log into or log in to?

The correct version is log in to because “log in” is a phrasal verb. “To” often follows “log in” as part of an infinitive verb phrase, but “in” and “to” should be kept separate.

  • Can you log in to update your contact information?
  • Emily logs in to her work computer every morning.

Use the QuillBot Grammar Checker to fix mistakes for free.

Is it tune into or tune in to?

The correct version is tune in to because “tune in” is a phrasal verb. “To” often follows “tune in” as part of an infinitive verb phrase, but “in” and “to” should be kept separate.

  • I’m tuning in to my favorite TV show this evening.
  • Please tune in to Radio 5 at 3 p.m. tomorrow afternoon!

Use the QuillBot Grammar Checker to fix mistakes for free.

Is it look into or look in to?

Look into is correct if you mean “investigate.” In this case, “look into” is a phrasal verb.

  • I will look into your request tomorrow.

Look in to is correct if you’re using the non-phrasal verb “look” with the preposition “in.”

  • Gemma looked in to see if her daughter had settled in.

Use the QuillBot Grammar Checker to fix mistakes for free.

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Julia Merkus

Julia has master's degrees in Linguistics and Language and speech pathology. Her expertise lies in grammar, language and speech disorders, foreign language learning, and child language acquisition.

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