Follow Up, Follow-Up, or Followup | Correct Spelling

Follow up is the correct spelling when used as a verb (e.g., “Let’s follow up on this tomorrow”), while follow-up is the correct spelling when used as a noun (e.g., “I attended a follow-up”) or an adjective (e.g., “I sent a follow-up email”). Followup is considered incorrect and should not be used.

Examples: Using follow up or follow-up in a sentence
Use Example
Follow up (verb) I sent several emails to follow up on our most recent conversation.
Follow-up (noun) My doctor asked that I schedule a follow-up within two weeks.
Follow-up (adjective) We had a follow-up meeting to discuss all the progress that has been made.

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*Despite Of | Definition, Correct Use & Examples

The preposition despite means “regardless of,” “even though,” or “notwithstanding.”

Despite and in spite of are also synonymous, but it’s important to remember that despite of is incorrect; the “of” is only needed in the other phrasing. The QuillBot Grammar Checker will fix this and other common mistakes automatically.

Examples: Despite of in a sentence
  • The dog keeps whining, despite of the fact that he’s been fed.
  • The dog keeps whining, despite the fact that he’s been fed.
  • The dog keeps whining, in spite of the fact that he’s been fed.

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Irregardless vs Regardless | Meaning, Definition & Examples

Irregardless is often used instead of the adverb regardless to mean “despite everything.” It’s typically used as a transition word at the beginning of a sentence to change the topic.

Many dictionaries and other language authorities consider irregardless a nonstandard word, so you should avoid it in academic writing or professional communication.

Examples: Irregardless or regardless in a sentence
Informal writing
Nonstandard (but sometimes accepted): I’m not sure about your advice, but I’m going to follow it irregardless.
Best option: I’m not sure about your advice, but I’m going to follow it regardless.

Formal writing
Not accepted: Irregardless, the organization remains committed to its environmental goals.
Accepted: Regardless, the organization remains committed to its environmental goals.

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Is It Ours or *Our’s? | Meaning, Spelling & Examples

Ours is a first-person plural possessive pronoun. It’s sometimes written as “our’s”—with an apostrophe—but this spelling is incorrect.

Possession is typically indicated by adding ’s to a word, but possessive pronouns are an exception to this rule. This means that “our’s” is always incorrect. This is also true for other possessive pronouns, such as hers and theirs. The QuillBot Grammar Checker will fix this and other common mistakes automatically.

Examples: Ours and our’s in a sentence
  • You paid for the food too! It’s not mine; it’s our’s!
  • You paid for the food too! It’s not mine; it’s ours!
  • Their project was not as good as our’s.
  • Their project was not as good as ours

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*Truely or Truly | Spelling, Meaning & Examples

Truly is the correct spelling of the adverb used to mean “absolutely,” “properly,” or “in a truthful manner.” The related adjective is “true.”

People sometimes write “truely” instead, but this is the wrong spelling and doesn’t appear in the dictionary. The QuillBot Grammar Checker will always catch pesky mistakes like this.

Example: Truely vs truly
  • Do you truely believe that?
  • Do you truly believe that?
  • I’m truely exhausted after my long journey.
  • I’m truly exhausted after my long journey.

Adding “-ly” to the end of an adjective is the standard way of forming an adverb. When the adjective ends with “-ue,” though, the “e” is usually dropped for the adverb form, as is the case with “true/truly” and “due/duly.”

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Is It Theirs or *Their’s? | Meaning, Spelling & Examples

Theirs is a third-person plural possessive pronoun. It’s also used as a gender-neutral singular possessive pronoun. It’s sometimes written as “their’s”—with an apostrophe—but this spelling is incorrect.

Possession is typically indicated by adding ’s to a word, but possessive pronouns are an exception to this rule. This means that “their’s” is always incorrect. This is also true for other possessive pronouns, such as ours and theirs. The QuillBot Grammar Checker will fix this and other common mistakes automatically.

Examples: Theirs and their’s in a sentence
  • I don’t know if you can borrow this iPad. It’s their’s, not mine.
  • I don’t know if you can borrow this iPad. It’s theirs, not mine.
  • I wish I had a friendship as special as their’s!
  • I wish I had a friendship as special as theirs!

Continue reading: Is It Theirs or *Their’s? | Meaning, Spelling & Examples

*Alot or A Lot (or Allot) | Which Is Correct?

A lot is a phrase meaning “often,” “very much,” or “a large number/amount.” People often combine the two words into “alot,” but this spelling is not listed in the dictionary and should not be used. Always write the phrase as two words.

Allot (with a double “l”) is an unrelated verb that means “distribute” or “assign.” Make sure not to confuse it with “a lot.” The QuillBot Grammar Checker will fix this and other common mistakes automatically.

Examples: A lot in a sentence Examples: Allot in a sentence
I learn a lot of new words by reading. The organization will allot funds to each department based on their needs.
Jennifer certainly talks a lot! The pandemic has led the government to allot more resources to public health.

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Is It Whoa or *Woah? | Meaning, Examples & Spelling

Whoa is an interjection used to express shock or surprise. It was traditionally used to command a horse or person to stop or slow down. Like other interjections, whoa should be avoided in professional communication and academic writing.

The use of the variant spelling woah is more common in UK English than US English, but in both cases, it’s not considered standard. Many dictionaries and other language authorities do not accept this spelling at all.

Examples: Whoa or woah in a sentence
  • Woah! Are you serious?
  • Whoa! Are you serious?
  • Woah, horsey! Slow down!
  • Whoa, horsey! Slow down!

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Is It *Jist or Gist? | Meaning, Spelling & Examples

Gist is a noun that typically means “most important idea” or “essence,” but it can also be used to refer to the grounds of a legal action. It’s almost always preceded by the definite article “the” (and can’t be used with the indefinite article “a”).

Jist is a misspelling of the word gist and should not be used. The QuillBot Grammar Checker catches and automatically corrects common mistakes like this.

Examples: Jist or gist in a sentence
  • I read the summary to get the jist of the novel’s plot
  • I read the summary to get the gist of the novel’s plot.
  • Can you give me the jist of the presentation in a few sentences?
  • Can you give me the gist of the presentation in a few sentences?

Continue reading: Is It *Jist or Gist? | Meaning, Spelling & Examples