Comma Before Too | Correct Use & Examples

Commas updated on  December 13, 2023 3 min read
In most contexts, it’s not necessary to put a comma before “too.”
When a comma is optional, you can add one to place more emphasis on “too.”

Examples: Comma before too
I’m ordering dessert too.
I’m ordering dessert, too.

You should put commas before and after “too” when it comes between a verb and its object (i.e., a noun, noun phrase, or pronoun that is affected by the action of a verb).

Example: Comma before too
I hope too that you’ll join us for the party.
I hope, too, that you’ll join us for the party.

When “too” is used at the start of a sentence, it should also be followed by a comma (however, we advise against using “too” in this way).

Example: Comma before too
Too she enjoys reading mystery novels.
Too, she enjoys reading mystery novels.

Similar guidelines also apply to using a comma before which, a comma before “as well as,” and a comma before or after “however.”

When to use a comma before (and after) too

You need a comma before and after “too” when it:

  • Comes between a verb and its object

  • Is used at the start of a sentence
Too between a verb and its object You should put commas before and after “too” when it comes between a transitive verb and its object (i.e., a noun, pronoun, or noun phrase that is affected by the verb).

This creates a pause before and after “too” and makes the sentence easier to follow.

Example: “Too” separating a verb from its object
They decided too that a vacation was long overdue.
They decided, too, that a vacation was long overdue.

Too at the start of a sentence

When “too” is used as an introductory word at the start of a sentence, it should be followed by a comma. This is also the rule for other conjunctive adverbs, such as “however” and “besides.”

Example: “Too” at the start of a sentence
Too the organization values innovation and sustainability in its business practices.
Too, the organization values innovation and sustainability in its business practices.

However, using “too” in this way is uncommon and may be perceived as unnatural or awkward. Instead, we recommend repositioning “too” in the sentence or replacing it with a synonym (e.g., “furthermore,” “additionally”).

Example: “Too” at the start of a sentence
Furthermore, the company values innovation and sustainability in its business practices.
The company values innovation and sustainability in its business practices, too.

When a comma before too is optional

When “too” comes between the subject and verb or appears at the end of a sentence, using commas is optional.

While placing commas around “too” is not mandatory in these instances, they can help to create a pause and place a greater emphasis on “too.”

Examples: Optional commas
We too are interested.
We, too, are interested.

The research has implications for space travel too.
The research has implications for space travel, too.

Use your own judgment to determine whether including commas improves the readability of your sentence.

In some instances, using commas may clearly improve the flow of your writing (e.g., when “too” comes after a subject composed of multiple words).

Examples: Comma before and after too to improve clarity
The Prince of Wales, too, will be in attendance.

Other ways to use too

While “too” is often used to mean “additionally” or “as well,” it can also be used to mean “excessively” or “extremely.”

In these instances, it’s used to modify an adjective or adverb that follows it (e.g., “too many”). Commas are not required when “too” is used in this way.

Examples: Other uses of “too”
I’ve eaten too much.
It’s too cold outside to play football.
You’re too excitable.

Do you want to know more about commas, parts of speech, email, or other language topics? Check out some of our other language articles full of examples and quizzes.


US vs UK

Commas

Commonly confused words

Modelling vs modeling

Comma before or after so

Into vs in to

Defence vs defense

Comma before or

Awhile vs a while

Favourite vs favorite

Comma before while

A vs an

Theatre vs theater

Comma before which

Its vs it’s

Organisation vs organization

Comma splice

Use to or used to

Tags

Eoghan Ryan

Eoghan has taught university English courses on effective research and writing. He is particularly interested in language, poetry, and storytelling.

Great! You've successfully subscribed.
Great! Next, complete checkout for full access.
Welcome back! You've successfully signed in.
Success! Your account is fully activated, you now have access to all content.