Led vs Lead | Definitions & Example Sentences

“Lead” (which rhymes with “seed”) is a verb that means “guide or direct” (e.g., “I will lead you to the classroom”). “Led” (which rhymes with “bed”) is the past tense and past participle form of “lead” (e.g., “I led her to the classroom”).

As a noun, “lead” has various definitions. It can refer to an example or precedent, leadership, or the distance someone or something has ahead of someone or something else. When used in this manner, “lead” also rhymes with “seed.”

“Lead” can also refer to a soft, gray metal. In this case, “lead” rhymes with “said.”

Examples: Led in a sentence Examples: Lead in a sentence
I led him to the boat we’d be using. He told me he’ll lead me to the store.
Carla led David to the examination room. My coach told me to increase my lead.
My sister led me to my surprise party. I bought lead for my mechanical pencils.

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Your vs You’re | Difference & Definitions

The difference between your and you’re is that “your” is a possessive adjective that indicates ownership (e.g., “Those are your tickets”), whereas “you’re” is a contraction for “you are” (e.g., “You’re going to love this”).

“Your” and “you’re” cause a lot of confusion because they’re homophones, meaning they sound the same but have different definitions (and, in this case, different spellings).

Examples: Your in a sentence Examples: You’re in a sentence
Your package is on the way. You’re going to love the present I got for you.
I will drop off your coffee on the way to work. He told me you’re going to Bali next month on your honeymoon.
Your dress looks fantastic! You’re not going to believe what just happened.

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All of a Sudden or All of the Sudden | Which is Correct?

The correct phrase is all of a sudden, which means “quickly,” “unexpectedly,” or “at once” (e.g., “All of a sudden, the dog jumped all over me”). “All of the sudden” is an increasingly common error, although there is no grammatical rule that explains why “a sudden” is preferred over “the sudden.”

Examples: All of a sudden or all of the sudden in a sentence
  • And then all of a sudden, everyone jumped out and screamed, “Surprise!”
  • And then all of the sudden, everyone jumped out and screamed, “Surprise!”
  • All of a sudden, the lights went out.
  • All of the sudden, the lights went out.

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Has vs Have | Difference, Meanings & Examples

“Has” and “have” are different forms of the verb “have,” which is primarily used to indicate ownership.

  • “Has” is used with singular subjects (e.g., “Dave”) and third-person singular pronouns (e.g., “it,” “she,” “he”).
  • “Have” is used in all other contexts, including with plural subjects (e.g., “kids”); first-person singular and plural pronouns (e.g., “I,” “we”); second-person singular and plural pronouns (e.g., “you”); and third-person plural pronouns (e.g., “they”).
Examples: Has in a sentence Examples: Have in a sentence
Dave has Kids have a colorful imagination.
It has very cool features. We have many years of experience.
She has a new motorcycle. You have a beautiful smile.
He has an elegant suit. They have the biggest house on the block.

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I Could Care Less | Meaning & Use

“I could care less” is a variant of the expression “I couldn’t care less,” which means “I’m not concerned or interested in someone or something.”

Many argue that “I could care less” is grammatically and logically incorrect because the statement conveys that one does care a bit, but it’s possible to care even less.

Despite its literal meaning, “I could care less” has been in use for a long time, and most people would understand it to indicate a lack of interest in something.

Examples: I could care less in a sentence
I could care less about where we go; I just want to eat.

She said she could care less about how the game ended because she had fun either way.

I could care less about what the reviews say; I thought it was a great book.

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Dieing or Dying | Correct Spelling & Use

When it comes to the verb that means “approaching death,” the correct spelling is “dying,” not “dieing.”

“Dieing” is a common incorrect spelling and should not be used.

Examples: Dieing or dying in a sentence
  • My plants are dieing because I forgot to water them.
  • My plants are dying because I forgot to water them.
  • The crops are dieing because of the ongoing drought.
  • The crops are dying because of the ongoing drought.
Note
Although some sources claim that “dieing” can function as a verb that means “to cut or shape a material using a die,” this usage is not common.

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Among vs Amongst | Definition & Examples

Among and amongst are different spellings of the same word. Both are prepositions that mean “surrounded by or included within a group of people or things.”

It is more common to hear “amongst” in British English than in American English. However, “among” is the more popular variant in both dialects. Deciding which word to use is a matter of style and formality. Although “amongst” is often considered the more formal of the two, it can seem out of place when used in American English, whether in writing or conversation.

Examples: Among in a sentence Examples: Amongst in a sentence
I found a rare flower hidden among the bushes. Amongst the numerous proposals, only one innovative idea stood out to us.
She spotted a bird nestled among the branches. During the excavation, a rare artifact was found buried amongst the rubble.
He found a beautiful antique book among all the garbage. He found a piece of Renaissance art hidden amongst the lesser-known works.

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Seperate or Separate | Correct Spelling & Definition

The correct spelling is always separate, not seperate.

“Separate” is a word that can function as a verb or an adjective. As a verb, its primary definition is “to divide into different parts or groups.” When used as an adjective, it describes something that is distinct or a unit by itself.

Examples: Separate as a verb Examples: Separate as an adjective
I need to separate the donations based on where they’re getting shipped to. These toys must go into separate compartments.
Let’s separate the students by age group. We will take separate cars to avoid being cramped.
We separated the room by placing a curtain down the middle. We had to buy a separate piece of furniture to complete the look.
Note
Separate can also function as a noun that refers to individual articles of clothing that can be worn in different combinations (e.g., “She packed separates for her trip to change up her look”). However, this usage is rare.

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Presume vs Assume | Difference & Examples

Presume and assume both mean “see something as true”; however, “presume” implies reasoning and likelihood, whereas “assume” suggests that there is no evidence.

For example, imagine you’re at work and a report goes missing. Without any proof, you might assume that the new intern took it to learn more about company affairs. However, if the intern is later overheard discussing the report’s details, it would be reasonable to presume that they took the missing report, although there is still no direct evidence. This scenario highlights that the subtle distinction between “presume” and “assume” depends on the available information.

When it comes to believing that something is true, the difference between “presume” and “assume” lies in the confidence and probability, or lack thereof.

Examples: Presume in a sentence Examples: Assume in a sentence
I presume you’ll be joining us for dinner tonight. Let’s not assume the worst without knowing all the details.
Since the lights are on, I presume someone is home. I assume the mail comes at the same time every day, but I don’t know for sure.
Based on the applause, one might presume the performance was a success. He assumed she wouldn’t mind if he borrowed her laptop, but he was mistaken.

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Once in a Blue Moon | Meaning, Examples & Origin

Once in a blue moon is an idiom that means “not very often” or “rarely.” It’s used to express that something doesn’t occur regularly. For example, if someone lives far away from the coast, it’s possible that they only go to the beach “once in a blue moon,” meaning they hardly, if ever, go.

Examples: Once in a blue moon in a sentence
Once in a blue moon, my sister and I go out dancing, but only when she’s in town.

I play the lottery once in a blue moon to try my luck.

My grandma, who prefers to stay at home, agrees to go on vacation with me once in a blue moon.

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