How Are You in Spanish – 7 Phrases & Examples

There are several ways to say how are you in Spanish, including:

  1. ¿Cómo estás? (How are you?)
  2. ¿Cómo te va? (How’s it going?)
  3. ¿Cómo va todo? (How’s everything going?)
  4. ¿Qué tal? (What’s up?)
  5. ¿Cómo has estado? (How have you been?)
  6. ¿Cómo te ha ido? (How have you been?)
  7. ¿Cómo andas? (How are you?)

Cómo estás (pronounced “ko-mo-ehs-taas”) is the simplest and one of the most common ways to say “how are you” in Spanish. Although it is considered more casual than other options, “cómo estás” is widely acceptable in both formal and informal settings (e.g., “Hola, mucho gusto. Soy Dra. López. ¿Cómo estás?”).

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Is Bestest a Word? | Meaning & Example Sentences

“Bestest” is an adjective meaning “very best.” Although it’s technically a word, it is considered nonstandard and should therefore be avoided in professional and academic contexts.

However, it’s acceptable to use the word “bestest” in informal settings, such as when you want to affectionately emphasize that someone is your most cherished friend.

Example: Bestest in a sentence
Laura is my bestest friend in the whole wide world.

My dog is the bestest companion for long walks.

That was the bestest movie I’ve ever seen.

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Subjective vs Objective | Definition & Examples

Subjective is an adjective that describes something as being based on individual perspectives and experiences (e.g., “That movie is too long in my opinion”). Objective means that something is based on verifiable data or evidence (e.g., “That movie is 180 minutes long”).

The difference between subjective and objective writing is that the former is based on personal viewpoints, whereas the latter is based on observable facts.

Subjective examples Objective examples
I don’t like the icing on the cake. That cake has cream cheese icing.
Dogs are so much better than cats. Dogs are the most popular pets in the world.
Tacos are tastier than pasta. Tacos are a Mexican dish, whereas pasta is Italian.

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Possum vs Opossum | What’s the Difference?

Although “possum” and “opossum” are often used interchangeably, they’re actually two distinct animals.

Possums are marsupials that are native to Australia and the nearby islands of New Guinea and Sulawesi. On the other hand, opossums—which are also marsupials—can be found throughout the Americas.

Possums and opossums differ in several ways, in addition to their geographic distribution.

Possums Opossums
Belong to the order diprotodontia Belong to the order didelphimorphia
Can weigh from half an ounce to twenty pounds (varies by species) Can weigh from two to fourteen pounds (varies by species)
Often have bushy tails, but this varies Have bare tails
Rounded features Pointed features with coarse hair

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Weather vs Whether | Definition & Example Sentences

“Weather” refers to the state of the atmosphere at a particular time and place. Words like “rainy,” “dry,” “cold,” and “hot” are often used to describe the weather (e.g., “I checked the weather app and saw that it’ll be rainy later”).

“Whether” indicates a choice or expresses doubt (e.g., “I wonder whether she’ll eat at home or go out to a restaurant”).

Examples: Weather in a sentence Examples: Whether in a sentence
I asked her to check the weather before we went on a hike. She wanted to know whether I bought the gift or made it.
I’m going to the beach, regardless of what the weather is like. He said he’d pass the exam whether he studied or not.

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Calfs or Calves | What’s the Correct Plural Form?

The correct plural form of the noun “calf” is “calves.”

This is the case whether you’re using “calves” to refer to the offspring of a domestic cow or the muscles behind your lower legs.

Examples: Calves in a sentence
We move the herd of calves into the barn every night.

After a difficult exercise session, my calves were sore.

Today, I learned that baby whales and elephants are also called calves.

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To vs Too | Difference, Definition & Examples

“To” is a preposition that is typically used to indicate movement towards something (e.g., “She drove to the store”). It’s also frequently used as a function word that indicates that the following verb is an infinitive (e.g., “My niece loves to dance”).

“Too” is an adverb that means “also” or “very” (e.g., “That’s too much candy for us”). It describes something as being excessive, additional, or more than enough.

Examples: To in a sentence Examples: Too in a sentence
We should go to the party. They were too scared to go inside the haunted mansion.
Eddy wanted to play the video game. Lauren ate too much and had a stomach ache.
Tip
Here’s an effective way to test if you’re using the right homophone: Replace the word in question with “also” or “very.” If the sentence still makes sense, then “too” is the appropriate choice.

  • I want to go too.
  • I want to go also.
  • She went to the mall.
  • She went also the mall.

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Row vs Column | Difference & Definitions

A row consists of people, things, or information placed in a straight line, side by side. A column consists of elements arranged one on top of the other.

In other words, the difference between a row and a column is that a row is horizontal, whereas a column is vertical.

An effective way to distinguish between a row and a column is to remember this rhyme: “row means left to right, column means height.”

Examples: Row in a sentence Examples: Column in a sentence
The books were aligned in a row from left to right. The plates were stacked one on top of the other, forming a neat column.
We were seated in the first row. My baby brother knocked down the column of folded clothes.
The kids were standing in a row for their class photo. It took me hours to stack the coins into neat and organized columns.

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Worse vs Worst | Meaning & Examples

“Worse” is a comparative adjective that describes something as “of poorer quality or condition.” It is used to explain that something has a lower quality when compared to something else.

“Worst” is a superlative adjective that describes something as “of the poorest quality or condition.” It indicates that something is of the lowest quality when compared to something else.

Examples: Worse in a sentence Examples: Worst in a sentence
The movie was bad, but the sequel was worse. That was the worst ice cream I’ve ever tasted.
The tea was bitter, and the coffee was even worse. She said stubbing her toe was the worst pain she’s ever felt.
Yes, the rain was brutal, but the cold weather was worse. I encountered the worst interpretation of the book while in class.

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Inter vs Intra | Meaning & Difference

“Inter” is a prefix meaning “between,” whereas “intra” is a prefix that means “within.”

For example, the word “international” means “relating to or occurring between multiple nations.” On the other hand, “intranational” means “occurring within a single nation.”

Examples: Inter and inter in a sentence
Because it was an international trip, we had to take a plane to get to our destination.

The country’s new policies focused on intranational developments.

The congressional hearing addressed both international trade agreements and intranational economic policies.

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