Once in a Blue Moon | Meaning, Examples & Origin

Once in a blue moon is an idiom that means “not very often” or “rarely.” It’s used to express that something doesn’t occur regularly. For example, if someone lives far away from the coast, it’s possible that they only go to the beach “once in a blue moon,” meaning they hardly, if ever, go.

Examples: Once in a blue moon in a sentence
Once in a blue moon, my sister and I go out dancing, but only when she’s in town.

I play the lottery once in a blue moon to try my luck.

My grandma, who prefers to stay at home, agrees to go on vacation with me once in a blue moon.

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Lets vs Let’s | Difference, Definitions & Examples

Lets and let’s are both derived from the verb “let,” which can be used to mean “allow or permit” or to introduce a request or suggestion. While “lets” is the third-person singular form of this verb (e.g., “I hope she lets you go”), “let’s” is a contraction that stands for “let us” (e.g., “Let’s go to the park”).

Many people get these words confused because they are homophones, meaning they have the same pronunciation but different meanings.

Examples: Lets in a sentence Examples: Let’s in a sentence
My dad lets me play video games once I’m done with my chores. Let’s hope that we can get out of class early.
She lets her younger sister help her garden because she knows it soothes her. Let’s not get ahead of ourselves.
Suzie lets Daniel leave early on Thursdays so he can visit his grandmother. I could be wrong, so let’s double-check the results before publishing them.

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Take It With a Grain of Salt | Meaning & Examples

Take it with a grain of salt is an English idiom that means “view or consider something with skepticism.” When someone uses this expression, they are suggesting that the information provided may not be entirely credible and therefore should be received with reservation.

Take it with a grain of salt examples
He claims to know what really happened, but I’d take it with a grain of salt until we see some more evidence.

The article provides plenty of financial tips, but make sure to take it with a grain of salt since it wasn’t written by experts.

The forecast claims it won’t rain. Take it with a grain of salt, though, because we’ve had unpredictable weather all week.

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Whisky vs Whiskey | Correct Spelling & Difference

Whisky and whiskey are umbrella terms that include several types of grain spirits. However, “whisky” is typically used when referring to grain spirits that were produced in Scotland, Japan, or Canada, whereas “whiskey” is the preferred spelling for grain spirits made in the United States or Ireland.

Examples: Whisky/whiskey in a sentence
My best friend was born and raised in Tennessee, so whiskey is his beverage of choice when we go out.

I plan on touring a whisky distillery when I go to Japan next year.

I don’t drink anymore, but when I did, Scottish whisky was my go-to drink.

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Whilst vs While | Meaning & Examples

Whilst and while both mean “at the same time” (e.g., “I ate while he slept”) or “in contrast to something else” (e.g., “I like hotdogs, while he prefers burgers”).

However, “while” can also be used as a noun to refer to a period of time (e.g., “a short while”). In this case, the words cannot be used interchangeably.

“Whilst” is more common in British English than in American English, but “while” is the more popular variant in both dialects.

Examples: Whilst vs while in a sentence
I’ll clean the dishes whilst/while you do the laundry.

She likes going to the mall, whilst/while I prefer online shopping.

Whist/while I was reading on the bench, my dog was napping by my feet.

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I Love You in Spanish | 7 Phrases & Examples

There are several ways to say I love you in Spanish.

  1. Te quiero (I love you)
  2. Te amo (I love you)
  3. Te adoro (I adore you)
  4. Estoy enamorado/a de ti (I’m in love with you)
  5. Me gustas mucho (I like you very much)
  6. Eres el amor de mi vida (You’re the love of my life)
  7. Estoy loco/a por ti (I’m crazy for you)

“Te quiero” (pronounced “teh-kyeh-rro”) is the simplest way to say “I love you” in Spanish. Although it’s more casual than other phrases, it can be used when talking to friends, family, or a romantic partner (e.g., “Te quiero mucho, hermano”).

Additionally, “te quiero” works whether it is being used by a man or a woman. Because Spanish is a gendered language, some of the phrases listed above have to be modified depending on the context (similar to the many ways of saying “nice to meet you” in Spanish).

For example, “estoy enamorado de ti” means “I’m in love with you,” but the phrase can only be used by a man. If a woman were using it, she would have to say, “estoy enamorada de ti.”

Note
In Spanish, some people use the letter “e” in nouns or adjectives as a more inclusive and nonbinary approach to writing. For example, instead of saying “ellos” (referring to a group of only men or a group of men and women) or “ellas” (referring to a group of women), some people use the term “elles” to avoid specifying gender.

However, the gender inclusive use of “e” in place of “o” or “a” is not officially recognized  and might lead to mixed reactions, as some people believe that the language should maintain the traditional spelling and grammar conventions that make it unique.

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Accidently | Correct Spelling, Meaning & Use

Accidently is a common misspelling of “accidentally,” which means “unintentionally.” Although “accidently” has been used for centuries and can sometimes still be found in published works, it is recommended to use “accidentally,” as the former is now typically viewed as an error.

Examples: Accidently vs accidentally in a sentence
Preferred: I accidentally bought the wrong brand and now I have to make a return.

Less common: I accidently bought the wrong brand and now I have to make a return.

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Lier or liar | Meaning, Correct Spelling & Examples

Liar is the correct spelling when referring to someone who is deceitful or untruthful (e.g., “Geez, you’re such a liar!”). More often than not, lier is an incorrect spelling of this word. Although technically a real, albeit rare, word, “lier” refers to someone or something in a horizontal position (e.g., “He’s lying down, so he’s technically a lier”).

“Lier” and “liar” are both derived from the verb “lie.” However, “lier” is associated with the meaning “to be or put oneself in a reclined position on a surface,” while “liar” is associated with the meaning “to make a dishonest statement.”

Examples: Lier and liar in a sentence
Years of playing hide and seek helped him become a good lier, remaining still and silent the longest.

We didn’t trust him because he was a known liar.

I was called a liar after I mistakenly said there was no more cake when there was.

He said that the last thing he wants to be known as is a liar.

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Fewer vs Less | Difference & Examples

The general rule is to use “fewer” with plural, countable nouns (e.g., “fewer water bottles”) and “less” with uncountable nouns (e.g., “less water”). However, there are some exceptions, such as when referring to certain quantities (e.g., “There is less than one mile remaining on our drive”).

Examples: Using fewer in a sentence Examples: Using less in a sentence
I learned fewer practical tips compared to the first class I went to. There’s less ice in the blue cooler, so put the drinks in the red one instead.
Martin had fewer objections than the previous contractor. Tomissa spends less time on social media now that she’s studying for the final exam.
We experienced fewer issues once we established dedicated teams. The project took less effort than we initially imagined.

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Mutually Exclusive | Meaning, Definition & Examples

Mutually exclusive is a phrase that describes two things as incompatible. Any scenarios described as “mutually exclusive” cannot happen simultaneously. For example, a student’s goals to pass an exam and not take the exam at all are mutually exclusive because both cannot occur at the same time.

Examples: Using mutually exclusive in a sentence
Our desires to get in shape and try new restaurants don’t have to be mutually exclusive, so long as we exercise often and choose healthy meals when we go out.

We discovered that the proposals are mutually exclusive; we can only implement one of them, not both.

I learned the hard way that going to sleep late and waking up early are mutually exclusive habits because I couldn’t do both for a prolonged period of time.

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