Months in Spanish | Capitalization & Pronunciation

The months of the year in Spanish are:

  • enero (January)
  • febrero (February)
  • marzo (March)
  • abril (April)
  • mayo (May)
  • junio (June)
  • julio (July)
  • agosto (August)
  • septiembre (September)
  • octubre (October)
  • noviembre (November)
  • diciembre (December)

Similar to the days of the week in Spanish, the months are all considered masculine nouns. Additionally, they don’t have to be capitalized unless at the start of a sentence (e.g., “Me voy de viaje el seis de mayo”).

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Continue reading: Months in Spanish | Capitalization & Pronunciation

You’re Welcome in Spanish | 9 Phrases & Examples

There are several different ways to say you’re welcome in Spanish, including

  1. De nada
  2. No es nada
  3. Por nada
  4. Está bien
  5. No hay problema
  6. No te preocupes
  7. Con gusto
  8. A la orden
  9. Es un placer

“De nada” is one of the most commonly used phrases and is suitable for both formal and informal contexts. QuillBot’s Paraphraser can help you refine your writing so you can convey the right tone, even when you’re writing in Spanish.

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Goodbye in Spanish | 7 Phrases & Examples

There are many ways to say goodbye in Spanish. A few of the most common are:

  1. Adiós
  2. Nos vemos
  3. Hasta luego
  4. Hasta pronto
  5. Hasta la próxima
  6. Cuídate
  7. Chao

Keep in mind that, similarly to saying “hi” in Spanish, some goodbye phrases are more suitable than others, depending on the context. For example, “hasta luego” is considered more formal than “chao,” which is a casual and colloquial expression. To find the right tone, use QuillBot’s free paraphrasing tool.

Continue reading: Goodbye in Spanish | 7 Phrases & Examples

Days of the Week in Spanish | Pronunciations & Order

The days of the week in Spanish are:

  • lunes (Monday)
  • martes (Tuesday)
  • miércoles (Wednesday)
  • jueves (Thursday)
  • viernes (Friday)
  • sábado (Saturday)
  • domingo (Sunday)

Spanish is a gendered language, meaning that all nouns are considered either masculine or feminine, and the days of the week in Spanish are all masculine (e.g., “el martes”).

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How to Say Yes in Spanish | 6 Phrases & Examples

(pronounced “see”) is the most common way to say yes in Spanish, as it is a direct translation. But similar to English, there are many other ways to say “yes” in Spanish, including claro, por supuesto, bueno, and cómo no.

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Examples of how to say yes in Spanish
Phrase Examples

(Yes)

, me gustaría probar el especial del día.

[Yes, I would like to try the daily special.]

Claro

(Of course)

Claro que te puedo ayudar con el proyecto.

[Of course I can help you with the project.]

Por supuesto

(Of course)

Por supuesto que vamos todos juntos.

[Of course we’re all going together.]

Bueno

(Alright)

Bueno, te esperaré aquí.

[Alright, I’ll wait for you here.]

Cómo no

(Of course)

¡Cómo no! Me encantaría acompáñate.

[Of course! I’d love to join you.]

De acuerdo

(Agreed)

De acuerdo. Nos vemos el lunes.

[Agreed. See you on Monday.]

Continue reading: How to Say Yes in Spanish | 6 Phrases & Examples

Have a Good Day in Spanish | 5 Phrases & Examples

Que tengas un buen día is a common way to say have a good day in Spanish. It’s suitable for most contexts, although it is considered a casual and informal expression. The formal version, “que tenga un buen día,” is used when speaking to someone older than you or with whom you want to show respect.

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QuillBot’s Paraphraser can help you get your tone just right, whether you’re writing in Spanish formally or informally. Try it today!

There are many other ways to say “have a good day” in Spanish. Keep in mind that they must be slightly altered depending on the context and recipient of the phrase. For example, if you’re speaking to a group of people, the correct version of the phrase above is “que tengan un buen día.”

How to say have a good day in Spanish
Phrase Example
Que tengas un buen día

(Informal)

¡Gracias por tu ayuda, Amanda! Que tengas un buen día.

[Thanks for your help, Amanda! Have a good day.]

Que tenga un buen día

(Formal)

Fue un placer conocerla, Dra. Ruiz. Que tenga un buen día.

[It was a pleasure meeting you, Dr. Ruiz. Have a good day.]

Que tengas un bonito día

(Informal)

Espero que te haya gustado el almuerzo. Que tengas un bonito día, hermano.

[I hope you liked the lunch. Have a good day, brother.]

Que tenga un bonito día

(Formal)

Que tenga un bonito día, señor Fernández.

[Have a beautiful day, Mr. Fernandez.]

Que pases un buen día

(Informal)

¡Te extrañaré, primo! Que pases un buen día.

[I’ll miss you, cousin! Have a good day.]

Que pase un buen día

(Formal)

Gracias por visitarme, abuelita. Que pase un buen día.

[Thanks for visiting me, Grandma. Have a good day.]

Que te vaya bien

(Informal)

Que te vaya bien, Óscar. Agradezco toda tu ayuda.

[All the best, Oscar. I appreciate all your help.]

Que le vaya bien

(Formal)

Fue un gusto verla, tía. ¡Que le vaya bien!

[It was good to see you, Aunt. All the best!]

Que estés bien

(Informal)

Gracias por la compra. Que estés bien.

[Thank you for the purchase. Be well.]

Que esté bien

(Formal)

Que esté bien, abuelo. Nos vemos pronto.

[Be well, Grandpa. See you soon.]

Continue reading: Have a Good Day in Spanish | 5 Phrases & Examples

What Is Your Name in Spanish | 5 Phrases & Examples

¿Cómo te llamas? (pronounced “ko-mo-teh-yaa-maas”) is one of the most common ways to say “what is your name” in Spanish.

However, keep in mind that this phrase is considered informal and that there are several other ways to ask someone their name in Spanish.

Try QuillBot’s free Paraphraser to help you write in Spanish with the right tone and style for your audience, whether formal or informal.

What is your name in Spanish
Phrase Example
¿Cómo te llamas?

(Informal)

Hola, mucho gusto. ¿Cómo te llamas?

[Hello, nice to meet you. What is your name?]

¿Cómo se llama?

(Formal)

Soy Andrea. ¿Y usted cómo se llama?

[I’m Andrea. And what is your name?]

¿Cuál es su nombre?

(Formal)

Encantada de conocerla. ¿Cuál es su nombre?

[It’s a pleasure to meet you. What is your name?]

¿Me podrías dar tu nombre?

(Informal)

Yo te puedo ayudar. ¿Me podrías dar tu nombre, por favor?

[I can help you. Could you give me your name, please?]

¿Me regalas tu nombre?

(Informal)

Tengo la lista de invitados. ¿Me regalas tu nombre?

[I have the guest list. Can I have your name?]

Continue reading: What Is Your Name in Spanish | 5 Phrases & Examples

Hi in Spanish | 6 Phrases & Examples

Hola (pronounced “oh-laa”) is how to say hi in Spanish.

While “hi” is considered slightly more casual than “hello” in English, in Spanish, “hola” can be used to say “hi” or “hello” and is appropriate in informal and formal contexts.

It’s common to add other phrases when saying “hi” in Spanish. For example, “Hola, mucho gusto” means “Hi, nice to meet you.”

There are a few other ways to say “hi” in Spanish, but keep in mind that some are considered more informal than others.

Hi in Spanish
Formal ways to say hi in Spanish Informal ways to say hi in Spanish
Hola

(Hi/hello)

Buenas

(Shortened form of good morning/afternoon/evening)

Saludos

(Salutations)

¿Qué me cuentas?

(What’s new?)

Buenos días/Buenas tardes/Buenas noches

(Good morning/afternoon/evening)

¡Hola, hola!
(Hello, hello!)
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How Are You in Spanish | 7 Phrases & Examples

There are several ways to say how are you in Spanish, including:

  1. ¿Cómo estás? (How are you?)
  2. ¿Cómo te va? (How’s it going?)
  3. ¿Cómo va todo? (How’s everything going?)
  4. ¿Qué tal? (What’s up?)
  5. ¿Cómo has estado? (How have you been?)
  6. ¿Cómo te ha ido? (How have you been?)
  7. ¿Cómo andas? (How are you?)

Cómo estás (pronounced “ko-mo-ehs-taas”) is the simplest and one of the most common ways to say “how are you” in Spanish. Although it is considered more casual than other options, “cómo estás” is widely acceptable in both formal and informal settings (e.g., “Hola, mucho gusto. Soy Dra. López. ¿Cómo estás?”).

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I Love You in Spanish | 7 Phrases & Examples

There are several ways to say I love you in Spanish.

  1. Te quiero (I love you)
  2. Te amo (I love you)
  3. Te adoro (I adore you)
  4. Estoy enamorado/a de ti (I’m in love with you)
  5. Me gustas mucho (I like you very much)
  6. Eres el amor de mi vida (You’re the love of my life)
  7. Estoy loco/a por ti (I’m crazy for you)

“Te quiero” (pronounced “teh-kyeh-rro”) is the simplest way to say “I love you” in Spanish. Although it’s more casual than other phrases, it can be used when talking to friends, family, or a romantic partner (e.g., “Te quiero mucho, hermano”).

Additionally, “te quiero” works whether it is being used by a man or a woman. Because Spanish is a gendered language, some of the phrases listed above have to be modified depending on the context (similar to the many ways of saying “nice to meet you” in Spanish).

For example, “estoy enamorado de ti” means “I’m in love with you,” but the phrase can only be used by a man. If a woman were using it, she would have to say, “estoy enamorada de ti.”

QuillBot’s free Grammar Checker can help you write “I love you” in Spanish perfectly by helping you avoid spelling, grammar, and punctuation mistakes.

Note
In Spanish, some people use the letter “e” in nouns or adjectives as a more inclusive and nonbinary approach to writing. For example, instead of saying “ellos” (referring to a group of only men or a group of men and women) or “ellas” (referring to a group of women), some people use the term “elles” to avoid specifying gender.

However, the gender inclusive use of “e” in place of “o” or “a” is not officially recognized  and might lead to mixed reactions, as some people believe that the language should maintain the traditional spelling and grammar conventions that make it unique.

Continue reading: I Love You in Spanish | 7 Phrases & Examples